Real Time Display innovations at the Home Office

Not content with displaying data for just their HQ building, John Cole, Head of Sustainability at the Home Office, has expanded the RTD project to provide transparency in energy consumption across a further 10 key Home Office sites, using data already being captured by the official meter data collector, thus minimising costs.

Real Time Display innovations at the Home Office

Background

In May 2010 all 18 Whitehall Central Government HQs were instructed to install real-time, online energy displays (RTDs as they have become known). The Home Office HQ, 2 Marsham Street, were the first to go live with an RTD, just ahead of the Department of Energy & Climate Change.

Early success

In October 2010 a competition was organised by the Cabinet Office to see which department could reduce their consumption by the most, September 2010 versus October 2010. The departments responded and made significant reductions in consumption. 2 Marsham Street finished 3rd place (out of 18 buildings) with a very substantial 8.9% drop in consumption.

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Not content with displaying data for just their HQ building, John Cole, Head of Sustainability, has expanded the RTD to provide transparency in energy consumption across a further 10 key Home Office sites, using data already being captured by the official meter data collector. Driving the RTD with Day+1 data whilst not as immediate as near real-time data, implementation costs are lower and it is equally as useful when comparing consumption on daily, weekly or monthly basis.

But who is the best?

Keen to extract more value from the RTD system John Cole asked the developers of eco|Driver to produce ideas for an inter-site league chart which could be used to compare the performance of sites. The Site League chart went live in October 2011 and it is now possible to compare the energy consumption of all the sites with the data normalised by the number of building occupants.

But what about CO2e from waste disposal

Not content with laying bare the energy consumption of 11 Home Office buildings, for the whole world to see (and question), 2 Marsham Street now also display their waste generation and the associated CO2e emissions from the disposal of this waste. Where to next? Can we do better with a league chart of energy consumption, floor by floor? Watch this space!